Tag Archives: virtual

Assuming You Have a Compass…

"But you know what they say..."

We all have a moral compass…it’s just that some work better than others. Unfortunately ethics, morals, and integrity are not something that can be taught in the classroom or even from a book as good as “Adventures in Public Relations.” It takes years of life experiences and wrong turns to get the damned thing working properly. It’s assumed that we will figure it out by the time we reach the professional world. But as they say, “if you assume, you make an ass out of you and me.”

An ethical dilemma in the communications field is both on the individual practitioner and the business as a whole. Sure, your communications person may have a defective moral compass, but it’s up to the entire organization to make sure everyone produces work they can stand behind. Conversely, it is the individual’s responsibility to step down if she feels a campaign is unethical.

Photoshopped diversity is a new classic in my opinion. It’s that thing where a company edits marketing material to include a minority in an attempt to appear diverse. You know?  The Society Pages wrote an interesting post about an incident  of “Photoshopped Diversity” at the University of Wisconsin. Apparently there was only one black student in the whole school. The University decided to take the

one picture they had of him and superimpose it into different school events. They just assumed (there’s that word again) he wouldn’t notice or care. Well, he did notice and he sued them for their actions.

So who is at fault here? The administration for sucking at including minorities, the marketing director who said “more diversity,” or the graphic designer who did the Photoshopping? They all had a hand in the situation, so do you fire them all? I don’t know man, but my motto is you shouldn’t do it if you don’t want your name on it. While you are trying to answer my hard hitting questions, check out these photos of Photoshopped diversity (it’s a real term I swear…kinda).

The Huffington Post was involved in an ethical controversy of a different nature back in August. The internet newspaper held a design competition inviting readers to submit a new logo for them. AKA “Hey you design professionals should create work for free!” The Post assumed (ahem) everyone would be okay with it. They were wrong. There was major backlash from the design community who accused the paper of unfairly treating designers.

This dilemma is a little less black and white than the University of Wisconsin ethics crisis. If the designers willingly submit work–even without compensation–then what’s the problem? There are plenty of jingle writing or logo designing contests out there. Do they all offer some form of compensation or is the recognition and publication of your work enough? Regardless, it would have helped smooth things over if the Post gave the winner some kind of prize.

Some ethical dilemmas are more obvious then others. I can’t speak for entire organizations, but as an individual, it’s important to go with your gut. You know that feeling in the pit of your stomach? Yeah, that’s your moral compass trying to steer you in the right direction. If something doesn’t feel right to you, there is a good chance someone else will feel the same way. And for Pete’s sake, don’t assume!

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We Are Fam-ilyy

"...communities are a lot like families. There are communities you are born into whether you like it or not and ones you choose to join."

This week we’re talking about Public Relations and community! No not that NBC show with Chevy Chase (although you should check that out too).

Community is when a  bunch of people untie over shared interests and common goals. Sometimes communities lives together, other times they are driven by a similar upbringing–or as Guth and Marsh prefer to call them, “geographic communities” and “psychographic communities,” respectively. Come to think of it, communities are a lot like families. There are communities you are born into whether you like it or not and ones you choose to join. Regardless of the circumstance, the concept of “community” effects how individuals behave–and that’s important to communications professionals like me!

One thing that struck me about this chapter in Issues in Public Relations, was its description of the virtual community as “a fairly recent creation.” I’ve said it once, and I’ll say it again, this is not the most recent guide to communications studies, however, it does show how rapidly things change in this business. Rather than focus on past instances of community relations, I’m going to look at the not-so-recent development of the virtual community.

Facebook is a community. Twitter, also a community. LinkedIn, Pintrest, Tumblr, blogger–need I say more? And within each of these major online communities, are millions of even more targeted segments. Virtual communities are an advertisers dream come true because they bring specific demographics together and make them accessible.

The best brands don’t just tap into existing communities, they create their own. In doing so, they control what and how messages are delivered to community members. I saw this concept in action at one of my past internships with a mid-sized marketing firm. For legal reasons, I’ll just call the firm MKT.

MKT created a Brand Ambassador program on behalf of a client to establish a virtual community. The MKT team updated a blog and Facebook page daily to maintain and strengthen the community. The posts ranged from random comments about the brand, to poll questions, videos, and even exclusive competitions/challenges. Unlike many other brands, MKT remains transparent throughout their communications. In a meeting, an MKT team member talked about how all the Ambassador’s knew him and even called when they had questions.

The MKT Brand Ambassador Program is the perfect example of how to utilize communities in Public Relations practices. The community gives its members positive feelings toward the brand, and as a result, the ambassadors spread the love.

Yet, I ponder…

Where should a brand draw the line of intimacy between the customer and the organization? And what are the ethical implications of Brand and Ambassadors? What can brands do to prevent overstepping their boundaries?

OR ARE THERE NO BOUNDARIES LEFT?!

   Just kidding. Of course there are. Brands have a right to mediate their messages and virtual communities–or any communities really–are fair game. With that said, brands should be careful not to overstay their welcome or else they may not be invited to the next family reunion.

 

 

 

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